REVIEW QWOP creator Bennett Foddy strikes again with Getting Over It
5 months ago • 2,487 Views

One Man, One Hammer, One Objective: Getting Over It.

Warning: Side effects of this game are: insanity, anger, lack of sleep, depression, anxiety, and overall feelings of hopelessness.

The controls are simple, and I mean simple. Your mouse controls the direction and speed of the hammer. That's it. Yes, just like finishing the 100 m in QWOP, the goal is achievable. You CAN get over it, but good Lord is it frustrating. Lose your cool for one moment, and hours, HOURS, of work can be undone. In one particular part of the game, a single misstep sends the player spiraling down to the starting point...and into a state of irritable depression.

Our human/cauldron hybrid's name is Diogenes, named after the Greek philosopher who lived in a tub, which at first glance appears to be the only connection between the two, but upon closer inspection can also be interpreted as a message on Internet culture from Bennett Foddy.

Mr. Foddy's view on the overall culture and design of the majority of video games is that they have become too easy and unrewarding to their players, a far cry from the days of Metal Gear Solid and Ghost 'n Goblins. He even mentions it in the long string of dialogue, ramblings, quotes and speeches constantly playing underneath you while you attempt to focus on the game. (Whether this was designed to enrage or inspire players, I'm not sure. It certainly succeeds in doing the former.) Diogenes, the philosopher, was also extremely critical of his culture, arguing that "Wisdom and happiness belong to the man who is independent of society." He traveled to Athens and made it his life's goal to challenge established customs and values, similar to what Foddy has been doing for the past ten years. Of course, 4th century political activism is a little bit different than 21st century Internet activism, but the similarities are still there.

To give you a slight taste on what you are in for here is the official trailer:





That voice seems benign now, but I promise you, Bennett Foddy's lovely Australian accent slowly, but surely, begins to chip away at your sanity. In a string of good fortune, Mr. Foddy gives you an option to turn off his commentary in the menu, a small reward, silencing that calm voice that seemingly taunts you at every fall.


As opposed to unlocking heroes, Getting Over It delivers a real sense of pride and accomplishment to the players upon completion. Overcoming many, seemingly insurmountable obstacles in a game likes this can give hope to people undergoing real life scenarios. As silly as it sounds, video games, sports and other interactive events that you have an active hand in, can really positively affect a mindset. Maybe I can pass the LSATs, rent my own place, get that job, etc. Getting Over It's underlying lesson of never giving up is not fully appreciated until Diogenes disappears from your screen.

Plenty of streamers and Youtubers have already lost their collective minds during this game; will you do the same?

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